Editorial / 28.01.2018

On Wednesday, January 10th, a group of approximately 30 citizens were provided a personal tour of the historic Pottawatomie County Jail and Courthouse. The tour, lead by Shane Jager, offered a good look into the incredible old structures. Citizens explored the architecture, stone, woodwork, vaults, offices, and courtroom. The tour began with the old jail, which is a flashback to days gone by. One single cell still boasts small windows, solid rock walls, and thick iron bars. One could just imagine cowboys from the past trying to pull bars from the window in an attempt to free ‘Ol Gabby....

Editorial / 17.12.2017

A board of Kansas history and architecture experts on Saturday will consider Pottawatomie County’s old courthouse, an aging limestone structure with an uncertain fate, for nomination to the National register of Historic Places and the Register of Historic Kansas Places. The Kansas Historic Sites Board of Review, a governor-appointed board that considers the historical value of sites, will review the 130- year-old Pottawatomie County Courthouse and Jail along with a handful of other locations during a 9 a.m. open meeting in the Museum Classrooms at the Kansas Museum of History. ...

Editorial / 20.11.2017

The Pottawatomie County Courthouse, whose long and storied history began in 1884 when it was constructed by local hands and stone, will now enjoy the status it so richly deserves: a place on the state’s historic register. On Saturday the Kansas Historic Sites review board voted unanimously in favor of its nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, an unprecedented move that responded to the groundswell of support from the citizens of the county and others who treasure our historic structures and places we hold in common. ...

Editorial / 02.11.2017

Live in fear if you walk near KSU limestone buildings, for they are crumbling, if you are to believe a recent assertion by Ross Hill of Belvue, Kan., in an attempt to augment his argument that the Pottawatomie County Courthouse, made of the same stone, should be razed. Perhaps enlightened folks at KSU attended to a previous issue, for they have recently updated and joined by a modern structure Seaton and Regnier Halls, both venerable and apparently stable and functional buildings. ...